Cyber Security Tip #29

Cyber Security Tip #29: What to do if you’re a victim of cyber crime • File a report with your local law enforcement agency. Even if your local police department or sheriff’s office doesn’t have jurisdiction over the crime (a common occurrence for online crime which may originate in another jurisdiction or even another country), you will need to provide a copy of the law enforcement report to your banks, creditors, other businesses, credit bureaus, and debt collectors. • Even though you may not be asked to provide evidence when you first report the cybercrime, it is very important to keep any evidence you may have related to your complaint. Keep items in a safe location in the event you are requested to provide them for investigative or prosecutive evidence • Make sure you change your passwords for all online accounts. When changing your password, make it long, strong and unique, with a mix of upper and lowercase letters, numbers and symbols. You also may need to contact your bank and other financial institutions to freeze your accounts so that the offender is not able to access your financial resources. • In cases where the offender is known, send the stalker a clear written warning saying the contact is unwanted and asking that the perpetrator cease sending communications of any kind. Do this only once and do not communicate with the stalker again (Ongoing contact usually only encourages the stalker to continue the behavior). • If you believe someone is using your social security number for employment purposes or to fraudulently receive Social Security benefits, contact the Social Security Administration’s fraud hotline at 1-800-269-0271. Request a copy of your social security statement to verify its accuracy. ‪#‎NCSAM‬

Cyber Security Tip #26

Cyber Security Tip 26: Avoid Fraudulent Phone Scams Cybercriminals don’t just send fraudulent email messages and set up fake websites. They might also call you on the telephone and claim to be from companies such as Microsoft. They might offer to help solve your computer problems or sell you a software license. Once they have access to your computer, they can do the following: Trick you into installing malicious software that could capture sensitive data, such as online banking user names and passwords. They might also then charge you to remove this software. Convince you to visit legitimate websites (like to download software that will allow them to take control of your computer remotely and adjust settings to leave your computer vulnerable. Request credit card information so they can bill you for phony services. Direct you to fraudulent websites and ask you to enter credit card and other personal or financial information there. Neither Microsoft nor legit computer software companies will make unsolicited phone calls (also known as cold calls) to charge you for computer security or software fixes. ‪#‎NCSAM‬